Before you get started

A room should be well ventilated when you are painting. Have windows open to provide a good flow of fresh air.

Before starting work, try to remove as much furniture from the room as possible.

Anything that is left should be covered with dust sheets to protect from overspray, drips and dust.

Surfaces should be well prepared before painting. Holes should be filled and all surfaces sanded and cleaned down. All-purpose filler can be used in walls, ceilings and wood. Alternative fillers are also widely available to meet special requirements, such as specific wood fillers or fine surface fillers.

Bare wood must be primed before further coating.

Emulsion paint for walls and ceilings can be applied direct to old painted surfaces, once cleaned and sanded, with two coats normally being required. For bare plaster the same system applies. For bare plasterboard (drylined surfaces), you must apply a primer/sealer to the surface before coating with emulsion.

Always try to start painting windows at the start of the day, so that they can be left in an open position to dry thoroughly before closing them again at night, thus preventing them from sticking.

When estimating paint quantities, it is best to be guided by your chosen paint manufacturer’s guidelines.

A light sand with a fine grade of sandpaper between coats of paint will provide the best finish.

Use the right brush type for best results. Pure bristle brushes for solvent based paint (like gloss) and synthetic bristle brushes for water based paint (like emulsion).

If painting the whole room, start with the ceiling first, then the walls and then doors, windows and skirting.

If a wall has minor surface imperfections such as lines between remaining emulsion paint and bare plaster that cannot be sanded down to a smooth edge, hang lining paper before repainting.

Prepare ceiling, walls and wood

1

Apply two coats of knotting solution to any bare knots in the woodwork. This seals the knot and prevents any sap from bleeding through the paint.

2

Once the knotting solution is dry,apply a single coat of wood primer.This provides the base for allsubsequent coats of paint.

3

Old painted surfaces can become dirty over years from smoke or fingerprints. Wash with sugar soap solution and rinse with clean water.

4

Fill any holes or cracks in ceilings and walls using a scraper or filling knife. Leave filler slightly proud of the surrounding wall surface.

5

Once the filler has dried, sand off all excess filler to a smooth, flat finish. Deep holes may take longer to dry or need refilling.

6

You can use all-purpose filler or wood filler to fill the holes in the wood. Some purpose-made wood fillers will dry to a harder finish.

7

Allow filled areas to dry and sand with a medium grade of sandpaper. Use a dusting brush or vacuum to clean off the tops of skirting boards.

8

Cut the end of the tube and the end of the nozzle off the flexible filler tube before loading in the cartridge gun.
 

9

Apply some flexible filler along the top edge of the skirting board, if required, and around any other joints between walls and wood.

10

Smooth flexible filler with a wet finger – it cannot be sanded later. Wash handsimmediately. Alternatively, wear vinyl gloves

Use a paintbrush

1

For emulsions and other water-based paints, dip brush in to one third bristle height. Remove excess on side.
 

2

Apply paint to wall in broad random strokes. Do not brush out the paint, but make sure it is an even coverage.
 

3

Without reloading the brush, ‘lay off’ the paint by gently brushing over the surface, so brush marks won’t appear.

4

Just let the tips of the bristles run over the surface, then reload and follow steps 1-4 for the next area.
 

5

For solvent-based (oil-based) paints, dip the brush in to one quarter bristle height. Remove excess on side.

6

Apply paint in small strokes in one direction. Paint two or three bands of colour for surfaces like doors.

7

Without reloading the brush, spread the paint in the opposite direction, brushing it out evenly.
 

8

Finally ‘lay off’ using the extreme tips of the bristles to even the finish. Move to the next area and repeat steps 5-8.

Use a roller

1

Load paint onto a roller in the reservoir of the tray. Evenly distribute by rolling roller over ribbed section of tray.

2

Apply the paint to the wall surface in sections using light even pressure on the roller head.
 

3

Applying two bands of paint with one loading of paint on the roller is a good technique.

4

Without reloading, lift the roller and work back across the area you have painted. Then reload and move on.

Use a paint pad

1

Load paint onto a pad in the reservoir of the tray. Evenly distribute by running pad over ribbed tray section.

2

Apply the paint in broad strokes to the wall surface using light even pressure on the pad.
 

3

Applying two bands of paint with one loading of paint on the pad is a good technique.

4

Use the pad to evenly distribute the paint by returning across the initial area of application.