Skip to content Skip to navigation menu
Basket 0

Planning & preparation

  • Here we will show you how to paint interior woodwork, including windows, doors, architrave and skirting
  • Before you can paint, you must ensure that the surfaces have been thoroughly prepared, as this is key to achieving a long lasting and professional looking finish. See our online guide, leaflet or video ‘How to Prepare Interior Woodwork for Painting’ for further information
  • Lay out heavy-duty protective sheets to protect the floor and cover any nearby furniture that can’t be removed from the room with dust sheets
  • Interior woodwork paint is available in several different finishes, so be sure to look at the range to find a paint that best suits your room
  • Some paints may require additional preparation, so be sure to always check manufacturer’s instructions before starting a project

Do it right

  • When painting woodwork, it’s best to use a water-based product as they are quick drying and don’t smell like solvent-based paint
  • When painting the skirting, secure your protective sheets with masking tape to further protect the floor
  • Make sure that your room is well lit so that you can clearly see any areas that you have missed. Whilst painting, regularly step back to look at the area from different angles to ensure that the coverage looks consistent

Staying safe

  • As paint can drip and splatter, it’s best to wear safety goggles throughout the painting process
  • If you need to use a stepladder to paint your woodwork, be sure to take care and not to overstretch
  • Make sure the room is well ventilated when painting, especially if you are using a solvent-based paint

Aftercare

  • Interior woodwork needs little maintenance once it has been painted. However, it’s best to wipe away any condensation as this can cause the wood to swell
  • Avoid using chemical based cleaners on your painted woodwork as they may damage the finish

Painting the undercoat

Step 1

Starting with the windows, apply masking tape to the window pane and either mask or remove any fittings, such as locks or latches.

 Guide Step
Step 2

Open your windows whilst you paint to prevent them from becoming sealed shut.

 Guide Step
Step 3

Check your manufacturer’s instructions and apply a coat of woodwork primer if recommended to do so. It’s best to use a small brush for windows.

 Guide Step
Step 4

Then, using a suitable wood undercoat, paint the windows and sills.

 Guide Step
Step 5

Mask off areas you want to protect on the doors, skirting and architrave, and apply the undercoat. If you are also painting the walls, you should finish applying the undercoat to all the woodwork before doing the topcoat on the walls.

 Guide Step
Step 6

Once the undercoat is complete, clean your brushes using water for water-based paints, or white spirit for solvent-based paints. Then, allow the undercoat to dry as per manufacturer’s instructions.

 Guide Step

Painting the topcoat

Step 1

Select the topcoat based on the style you want. There are many options available such as eggshell, matt, satin and gloss.

 Guide Step
Step 2

As with the undercoat, it’s best to start with the windows followed by the skirting boards, architraves and then doors.

 Guide Step
Step 3

Be mindful not to overload your brush, as interior woodwork paint tends to be thicker than emulsion and will drip if too much is applied.

 Guide Step
Step 4

Always use a suitably sized brush and take your time on any areas that meet your walls or floor.

 Guide Step
Step 5

If you do accidentally get paint onto your walls, wipe it off with a cloth immediately.

 Guide Step
Step 6

Check manufacturer’s instructions for drying times and allow the first coat to dry completely before applying the second coat.

 Guide Step
Step 7

Once the second coat has dried, carefully remove any masking tape and replace all fittings and fixtures.

 Guide Step